About EdProf

I am a professor of education working in a research university in the American Southwest. My academic blogs are intended to make useful information available to readers with interests in qualitative research, educating professionals and educational studies.

CSFE at the 2019 AESA Meeting

The Council for the Social Foundations of Education (CSFE) 2019 Business Meeting at AESA is scheduled for

Saturday, November 2nd 1:45 pm – 3:15pm, in the Executive Boardroom, Hyatt Regency, Baltimore MD

All Council for Social Foundations (CSFE) member organizations are invited to send representatives to this year’s business meeting.  AESA members interested in the work of the Council are warmly invited to attend as well.  If you would like to learn more about the Council but are not able to attend the meeting this year, contact: Jameson Brewer, University of North Georgia, Kelly McFaden, University of North Georgia, or Jan Armstrong, University of New Mexico

AESA 2019 Annual Meeting

The American Educational Studies Association (AESA) will hold its annual meeting at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Baltimore, MD, October 30 – November 3.

The conference program is available online.
AESA Website: educationalstudies.org

John Dewey Society Emerging Scholars Panel – Call for Proposals

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Emerging Scholars Panel
Due: March 10, 2019

The John Dewey Society calls for paper proposals for its panel for emerging scholars to be held at its annual meeting in conjunction with the American Educational Research Association meeting in Toronto in April 5-6, 2019.

Theme — Dewey in/and China: Cultural Transformation & Progressive Education in International Settings Today

2019 marks the centennial of the start of John Dewey’s stay of two years and two months in China. This year the John Dewey Society is exploring topics related to the above theme, including nationalism, populism, John Dewey’s influence in China, the intersection of pragmatism and Confucianism, and the role of culture. While the general call for proposals has ended, the John Dewey Society has an exciting new opportunity for those in the nascency of their academic careers. Or, simply, emerging scholars. We call for papers, both completed and in progress, on any topic related to John Dewey. While this call is broad, papers must use Dewey as the central focus.

Once identified, each emerging scholar will be paired with a senior scholar at the John Dewey Society annual conference. There the senior scholars will workshop the paper with the emerging scholar, offer guidance for potential publication, as well as answer any questions the emerging scholar has. This is an excellent opportunity to: (1) receive invaluable mentoring from established scholars and (2) make professional and academic connections.


How to Submit

Submit all proposals (prepared per instructions below) for individual papers via email with an attachment as a Word document. All proposals are due by midnight Eastern time March 10, 2019 via email to B. Jacob Del Dotto, John Dewey Society Emerging Scholars Coordinator, Loyola University-Chicago bdeldotto@luc.edu; Any questions – contact Jacob Del Dotto directly via email.
Proposals accepted for presentation in this panel of the John Dewey Society will be notified by March 15, 2019.  Full copies of the papers to be workshopped must be submitted by March 22, 2019.

Proposal Guidelines
Part 1 (submit in the body of your email message with the subject line JDS Emerging Scholars Proposal)
(1.) Title of your paper and theme your proposal addresses

(2.) Your name, title, institutional affiliation (if any)
(3.) Your address, phone, email
(4.) An abstract of up to 100 words

Part 2 (in an attached Word document with all identifying information removed for anonymous review)
(1.) Title of your paper
(2.) A descriptive summary of your paper (maximum length 1000 words), explaining your paper and its significance, especially in relation to your selected theme. List several references to place your contribution in the broader scholarly conversation

About The John Dewey Society (http://www.johndeweysociety.org)
Founded in 1935, the purpose of the Society is to foster intelligent inquiry into problems pertaining to the place and function of education in social change, and to share, discuss, and disseminate the results of such inquir

Thank you,

Jessica Heybach

Centennial Colloquium on Dewey: Then and Now

[Forwarded from JDS – to Friends of The John Dewey Society]

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing as director of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools to invite you to participate in a conference we are hosting in Chicago from May 2-4, 2019, the Centennial Colloquium on Dewey: Then and Now. The conference commemorates the 100th anniversary of a transformative two-year trip to China made by University of Chicago Laboratory Schools founder John Dewey. As a member of the John Dewey Society, I believe this conference will be of interest to you, and that the conference will be enriched by your presence.

Event Webpage: http://www.cvent.com/events/centennial-colloquium-on-dewey-then-and-now/event-summary-e2399535a5e14f2db5883f1464c216ce.aspx?dvce=1

Educator and philosopher John Dewey and his wife, Alice, founded the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools in 1896. Today, as then, Lab is a community of educators who, reflecting the intellectual rigor and evidence-based research of the University of Chicago, advocate for best practices to prepare students for fulfilling lives. In our classrooms, we honor, explore, and interpret Dewey’s ideas about teaching and learning—ideas that Dewey shared in a series of lectures at schools and universities across China from 1919 to 1921. The Centennial Colloquium on Dewey: Then and Now will bring together international researchers, policy-makers, and school-level educators to examine Dewey’s impact and further our understanding of how education has evolved.

The conference features 18 speakers from the United States and China, including keynote speakers University of Chicago Nobel laureate James J. Heckman and Professor Shi Zhongying of Beijing Normal University. Session topics range from Dewey’s past and present impact in the US and China to current challenges in Chinese education, meeting the needs of rural students, and progressive approaches to art and education.

True to Dewey’s philosophies, the conference also includes a variety of hands-on experiences. Participants can observe classes at the Lab Schools and UChicago charter schools, reflect on issues of civic engagement by visiting organizations that serve Chicago’s South Side, screen a documentary film made by high school students from Chicago and Beijing about their trip retracing Dewey’s path through China, and participate in an art activation project.

The full schedule, information on registration and accommodations, and more about the conference can be found online. Please contact us with any questions.

John Dewey believed in continuous learning. Through this conference, we can learn from experts, from students, and from one another, furthering his legacy, and our own education. I hope you are able to join us.

Warm regards,

Charles Abelmann

Director, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

cabelmann@ucls.uchicago.edu

————————————————-

Colleen Newquist Communications

708.822.6323

colleen@colleennewquist.com

 

CSFE Meeting at AESA 2018

A CSFE Special Interest Group meeting is scheduled for 8 AM, November 8, 2018 in the Crepe Myrtle Room (Hyatt Regency Greenville, SC).  If you are a member of one of the many different CSFE member organizations, including AESA, and have an interest in the future work of the Council for Social Foundations of Education, you are warmly invited to attend!   If you would like to become involved in the CSFE but are not able to attend the meeting this year, contact Jan Armstrong, University of New Mexico.

John Dewey Society — Call for Proposals

JohnDeweySocietyLogo

 2019 Theme
Dewey in/and China:
Cultural Transformation & Progressive Education in International Settings Today
John Dewey Society Panel on Dewey and Philosophy
CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The John Dewey Society calls for paper proposals for its panel on Dewey and Philosophy to be held at its annual meeting in conjunction with the American Educational Research Association meeting in Toronto in April 2019.  For information about the JDS, go to (http://www.johndeweysociety.org)

2019 marks the centennial of the start of John Dewey’s stay of two years and two months in China. He arrived in China at a time of cultural transformation and upheaval. There was the spread of a new vernacular called Paihua that signaled a ferment of thought. The New Culture movement and the May Fourth (1919) student uprising focused on Western science amidst a new found nationalism and populism.

Today, Dewey’s influence in China is broad and deep, though it underwent a number of shifts since that time. His early influence peaked in the decade following his visit, and he was later savagely criticized by the Communist regime shortly after his death in 1952. For many scholars, this criticism indicated the depth that Dewey’s influence still had on Chinese culture. At present there is a resurgence of Dewey in China, evidenced in part by the recent translation of the collected works of Dewey into Chinese, published in 2015, and the work of the Dewey Center at Fudan University (see the research note in the spring 2018 issue of Dewey Studies).

One of the main reasons that Dewey had such a profound influence on China was due to his pragmatism and its relation to Confucianism, which emphasizes thought for its usefulness in social situations and for living a good and proper life. Dewey’s philosophy fit with traditional Chinese culture, even though Confucianism was under attack as an old tradition during the New Culture movement at that time in China.

However, the 20th century was a time when Chinese culture changed dramatically with the influence of Marxism and Communism. Dewey had warned against a wholesale acceptance of Marxism and Communism, and later was condemned for this way of thinking. Dewey did not call for the general rejection of Chinese culture or complete adaptation of Western culture, but for a new culture that would come about through a careful evaluation and reflection upon both cultures. He asks in his critical review of Bertrand Russell’s The Problem of China: “…what is to win in the present turmoil of change: the harsh and destructive impact of the West, or the internal recreation of Chinese culture inspired by intercourse with the West” (MW 15:218).

We call for papers that not only may take up an explicit study of Dewey in/and China, but that also deal with the themes of cultural transformation and progressive education more broadly in other worldwide contexts and in other countries, including North America. In considering Dewey together with Chinese and other cultures, we can ask a number of questions that are specific to Dewey in/and China but can be extended to other contexts elsewhere, such as:

  • How has Chinese or other cultures been changed or transformed by Deweyan influence?
  • Was Dewey’s philosophy affected by his stay in China?
  • What are current manifestations of Deweyan philosophy in China, and other countries? How is it demonstrated in pedagogy, curriculum, and school planning and leadership?
This list is in no way exhaustive regarding Dewey in/and China, and Dewey’s influence more broadly in the world. Accepted submissions will also be considered for publication in one of the journals sponsored by the John Dewey Society, including Education & Culture, Journal of School and Society, andDewey Studies.

HOW TO SUBMIT
Submit all proposals (prepared per instructions below) for individual papers via email with an attachment as a Word document. All proposals are due by midnight Eastern time November 30, 2018, via email to Sarah Stitzlein, John Dewey Society President-Elect, Professor, University of Cincinnati, Sarah.Stitzlein@uc.edu; Any questions – contact Sarah Stitzlein directly via email.

Proposals accepted for presentation in this panel of the John Dewey Society will be notified by January 15, 2019. Full papers of up to 5000 words (excluding references) will be due no later than March 15, 2019 for the discussant to prepare remarks.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES
Part 1 (submit in the body of your email message with the subject line JDS Proposal)
(1.) Title of your paper and theme your proposal addresses
(2.) Your name, title, institutional affiliation (if any)
(3.) Your address, phone, email
(4.) An abstract of up to 100 words

Part 2 (in an attached Word document with all identifying information removed for anonymous review)
(1.) Title of your paper
(2.) A descriptive summary of your paper (maximum length 1000 words), explaining your paper and its significance, especially in relation to the selected theme. List several references to place your contribution in the broader scholarly conversation.

About The John Dewey Society (http://www.johndeweysociety.org)

Founded in 1935, the purpose of the Society is to foster intelligent inquiry into problems pertaining to the place and function of education in social change, and to share, discuss, and disseminate the results of such inquiry.

AESA 2018 Annual Meeting

 

The AESA annual meeting will be held on November 7 – 11, 2018 at the Hyatt Regency Greenville in Greenville, South Carolina.

The program will be available soon through the AESA website (educationalstudies.org)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

AESA President-elect Roland Sintos Coloma (Northern Kentucky University) and the 2018 Program Committee announced the theme for the 2018 Annual Meeting:

“Dare We Build a New Global Order?”

The American Educational Studies Association (AESA) was founded in 1968 in the midst of major upheaval and change in the United States and across the globe. From protests against empire, war, and militarism, to demands for civil rights, economic reforms, and inclusive education, it was a turbulent period that fundamentally challenged the United States’ own foundations internally and internationally. The calls for social change took place in the classrooms and the streets, in legal courts and popular culture, in political conventions and the Olympics. Fifty years later, we confront similar realities and advocacies within the current context of neoliberalism and cosmopolitanism. The struggles against white supremacy, hetero-patriarchy, labor and class exploitation, ableism, environmental degradation, religious fundamentalism, nativism and narrow nationalism continue to marshal individuals and collectives for a future worth fighting for. In these struggles, both in the past and present, are the radical hope and promise of a sociality and polity underpinned by equity, intersectionality, justice, and love.

As AESA celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2018 and projects its next 50 years, how do we pursue and engage in intellectual, pedagogical, and political projects that envision and enact a different global order? How do we analyze “America” and the tools and effects of its hard and soft powers, while simultaneously decentering it? In what ways can we situate our work as researchers, educators, and activists that locates the United States within transnational frames and the global flows of ideas, people, money, and technologies? How do we resist the audit culture of standardization, testing, and ranking and the commodification of critical knowledges at local, national, and global scales? What can we learn from ontologies, epistemologies, and methodologies from below and elsewhere, from the margins and the borderlands, from the Indigenous and the migrants, from those considered non-normative, illegible, or disposable? What happens when we create and employ a different grammar of critique, transformation, and possibility? What kind of future might we build together, and what difference might this difference make?

We invite panel, interactive workshop, and individual paper submissions on a wide range of topics that may include, but are not limited to, the annual meeting theme.