About EdProf

I am a professor of education working in a research university in the American Southwest. My academic blogs are intended to make useful information available to readers with interests in qualitative research, educating professionals and educational studies.

John Dewey Society @ AERA

JDS CONFERENCE @ AERA | APRIL 13-14, 2018 

DRAFT PROGRAM SCHEDULE

APRIL 13th

Pre-Conference Workshop (Democracy in Education Initiative) 

JDS Symposium | Nationalism: War and Peace | 12:00pm – 1:45pm

  • Leonard Waks (Temple University)
  • Jacoby Carter (John Jay College)
  • Sasha Polakow Suransky (New York Times)
  • Meira Levinson (Harvard University)

School and Society Forum | Maxine Greene Institute | 2pm – 3:45pm

Dewey Lecture | Scott Shapiro (Yale Law School) | 4pm – 5:30pm

Reception | to follow
APRIL 14th

Executive Board and Directors Meeting | 9am-10am

Dewey and Philosophy Panel I | 10am -11:45pm

Dewey and Philosophy Panel II | 1:00pm – 2:45pm

Business Meeting | 3:00pm – 4:00pm

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Society of Professors of Education @ AERA

4/4/2018

Dear SPE Members:

Hope this finds everyone well and in good spirits!  It is time to vote for our next set of SPE Board Members (3-year term, 2018-2020). Our five candidates are vying for three spots with as I said a 3-year term. The bio sketches and a ballot are attached.

I’m also attaching a current listing of Society Officers and Board Members, just so you can see who’s in charge of what. We also have a finalized program for our annual meeting at AERA attached.

Here’s the basic information:

Meeting:        Society of Professors of Education Annual Meeting
Date:              Saturday, April 14, 2018                                                                                         Time:              8:00am – 5:00pm
Hotel:             Sheraton New York Times Square
Room:            Sheraton NY Ballroom West

For a second year in a row a “special thanks” goes out to Dan Tanner and his Foundation for contributing $1,000.00 in the form of a grant to cover the room rental for our annual meeting and rental incidentals. Dan and the Foundation’s trustees which is made up of Peter Hlebowitsh, Dennis Buss, James Hayden, William Wraga and Lloyd Chilton). Thanks Dan and trustees for the grant and continuing to be good friends to the Society.

You will notice on the membership renewal form (also attached) that you can now pay through PayPal. I’m not great at it, but it is working. Since everyone has to make a choice in dues payments, and I need to keep up-to-date membership information. I’m asking that you send me, through email, a completed renewal form indicating how much I need to be billed through PayPal. I will then send you an invoice to your email address and you can pay with credit card. I fought it for a few years, but now I’m into it! Of course you can still send me a check via U.S. mail—that still works fine with me.

Finally, I’m working to up-date the master listing, so this first round of emails is not as up-to-date as I want it to be. But my next one in a few days will contain a listing of all members and their most recent dues payment.

Bob Morris, Society Secretary/Treasurer
Robert Morris, Professor
Dept. of Early Childhood through Secondary Education
University of West Georgia
1601 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30118

rmorris@westga.edu

SPE 2018 Program FINAL

SPE 2018-2019 Membership Form

Officers 2017-2018

Intersections: Call for Submissions

Call for Submissions for Spring 2018 Issue
Deadline: February 1, 2018
Sponsored by the University of New Mexico’s Department of Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies, Intersections: Critical Issues in Education is an online, peer-reviewed, open access academic journal. We seek to deepen understanding of how race, class, gender, sexuality, exceptionalities, power, well-being, and other subjectivities play out in educational settings as a means of advancing social justice for all people. Intersections serves as a forum for diverse voices and perspectives reflecting a variety of disciplines, focusing on work that interrogates, disrupts, and challenges oppression. We welcome a range of materials, including academic papers, personal perspectives, and other innovative forms of scholarship that may speak to an audience beyond academia.
We seek original creative or scholarly submissions that examine critical issues in education, including but not limited to schooling and society, language diversity, literacy and culture, curriculum and practice, subjectivities/identities, policy and reform, spirituality, health and well-being, multimedia and digital technologies, globalization, health, gender, critical literacy, race, power, and (dis) ability studies. We welcome submissions in a variety of formats, from empirical articles and position papers to memoirs and reviews of literature; essays; academic commentaries; interviews; book and media reviews. Submissions in other genres are also encouraged, including well-crafted poetry, artistic works, fiction, documentary film or short film, video of an event with scholarly commentary, scholarly conversations (print, audio, performance), and more. For more information, contact us at intersections@unm.edu or via

Society of Professors of Education 2018 Call for Proposals

Speak the Truth and Expose Lies: The Responsibility of Professors of Education in Hard Times

SPE 2018 Call for Proposals (Due 1/13/18)

As Spiderman’s Uncle Ben told us, “With great power comes great responsibility.” While it’s arguable whether his advice applies to professors of education, the Society’s conference theme for this year draws on Noam Chomsky’s reminder that even our limited power as intellectuals does come with responsibility. We invite you to join the conversation about what those responsibilities might entail in these difficult times.

What does it mean to be a professor of education in the current climate? How can we nurture in our students and ourselves the bravery that will allow us to face today’s challenges? What is the value of work in education as contrasted (or in collaboration) with other disciplines? How can scholars work more closely with teachers and other educational practitioners? How can we build bridges to other communities? What are our responsibilities for advocacy?

The Society of Professors of Education (SPE) invites proposals for presentations at its annual meeting, to be held during the 2018 AERA Annual Conference in New York City from April 13th to 17th. We are especially interested in presentations that are focused on the theme of “Speak the Truth and Expose Lies: The Responsibilities of Professors of Education in Hard Times.” Proposals not related to the theme but focused on the goals of the Society (below) are also welcome.

Founded in 1902, the Society of Professors of Education is a professional and academic association open to all persons engaged in teacher preparation, curriculum studies, educational foundations, and related activities. The Society’s primary goal is to provide a forum for consideration of major issues, tasks, problems, and challenges confronting professional educators. SPE is an interdisciplinary organization. Its members include both scholars and practitioners in education.

All presenters must be members of the Society of Professors of Education in order to be included in the conference program. We encourage you to join the Society at your earliest convenience. You will find a membership form at the Society of Professors of Education web page at:

http://societyofprofessorsofeducation.com

Please visit the Society of Professors of Education Facebook Group page (and join us!) at the following URL address:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/Society.of.Professors.of.Education/

Proposals must be submitted electronically to the Program Chair Jason Lukasik no later than January 13, 2018. The proposal must be sent as a Word document attachment in an e-mail addressed to SPEsubmissions@gmail.com. The subject line of the e-mail message must read: “SPE 2018 Proposal.”

Cover Sheet: Each proposal should have a separate cover sheet that lists: 1) title of the paper; 2) names, affiliations and relevant backgrounds of all participants; 3) address, telephone number, and e-mail address of the person submitting the proposal and addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of all participants. The cover sheet will not be sent to proposal reviewers. Except for the cover sheet, the proposal must not contain any information that identifies participant(s).

Length: Proposals should be between 350-500 words. The proposal should restate the title of the presentation, its contents, its format of the presentation (e.g., paper session, roundtable, or symposium), and its significance. The proposal should NOT identify the presenters.

Call for Reviewers:

In addition to submitting your work, another way that you can participate in the Society is to volunteer as a proposal reviewer. The review process will take place soon after the deadline. Please contact Program Chair Jason Lukasik at lukasik@augsburg.edu if you are interested in reviewing proposals for the 2018 meeting.

Looking forward to seeing you at AERA in New York!

Best,

Isabel Nuñez
Professor, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
President, Society of Professors of Education

AESA 2017 Critics’ Choice Book Awards

An announcement from Eleanor Blair, Western Carolina UniversityCritics’ Choice Book Awards, Chair:  Congratulations to the winners!

AESA 2017 Critics’ Choice Book Award Winners

Au, W., Brown, A., & Calderon, D. (2016). Reclaiming the Multicultural
Roots of U.S. Curriculum: Communities of Color and Official Knowledge
in Education. New York:  Teachers College Press.

Camicia, S. P. (2016). Critical Democratic Education and
LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum: Opportunities and Constraints. New York:
Routledge.

Carter, J. & Lochte, H. (Eds.) (2017). Teacher Performance Assessment
and Accountability Reforms: The Impacts of edTPA on Teaching and
Schools.  New York: Palgrave McMillan.

Cervantes-Soon, C.G. (2016).  Juarez Girls Rising: Transformative
Education in Times of Dystopia. Minneapolis, MN:  University of
Minnesota Press.

Childers, S.M. (2017).  Urban Educational Identity: Seeing Students on
Their Own Terms. New York: Routledge.

Douglas, T. M. O. (2016). Border Crossing Brothas: Black Males
Navigating Race, Place, and Complex Space. New York: Peter Lang
Publishers.

Gottesman, Isaac. (2016). The Critical Turn in Education: From Marxist
Critique to Poststructuralist Feminism to Critical Theories of Race.
New York: Routledge.

Meiners, E. R. (2016). For the Children: Protecting Innocence in a
Carceral State. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Noddings, N. and Brooks, L. (2017). Teaching Controversial Issues: The
Case for Critical Thinking and Moral Commitment in the Classroom. New
York: Teachers College Press.

Sanders, C.R. (2016).  A Chance for Change: Head Start and
Mississippi’s Black Freedom Struggle. Chapel Hill, NC: University of
North Carolina Press.

Tavares, H.M. (2016).  Pedagogies of the Image: Photo-archives,
Cultural Histories, and Postfoundational Inquiry. Springer Nature
Publishing.

Wolfmeyer, M.  (2017).  Mathematics Education: A Critical
Introduction.  New York:  Taylor & Francis.

 

 

AESA Statement of Concern

Greetings, AESA members and other listserv subscribers…

The Executive Council of the American Educational Studies Association
directs your attention to the following statement:

STATEMENT OF CONCERN (4/27/17)
The Executive Council of the American Educational Studies Association
wants to express publicly our deep concern about recent U.S.
executive, legislative, and judicial actions taken at odds with AESA’s
most deeply held values.  In the face of such actions, we want to
reaffirm truth, love, and justice as AESA’S guiding values.  AESA’s
scholarly commitments to public education, to democracy and the arts,
to cultural diversity and environmental sustainability, educational
equality and equity are reflected in our Standards for Academic and
Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational
Studies, and Educational Policy Studies.  Recent political rhetoric
and actions have imperiled our conscientious work to uphold them.

Our members’ language, inquiries, situations, standpoints, and
strategies for interpreting, expressing, and transmitting those deeply
shared core values in multiple disciplines are various and
dynamic–ever subject to elaboration, critical debate, and mutual
deliberation, irreducible to any dogma.  Yet the intensity of our
present shared concern moves us to make this brief public statement.

We condemn the targeting of any named religious, racial, sexual,
differently-abled, or ethnic group for exclusionary, discriminatory,
violent, and hateful speech or action as inconsistent with the
nation’s democratic ideals—harmful to children and profoundly
miseducative.  We hold dear the United States’ historic hospitality to
refugees from oppression elsewhere, so eloquently proclaimed on the
Statue of Liberty, yet so often abused and selectively applied, and
welcome diverse arts and humanities scholars and social-scientific
researchers who bring conscientious imagination, critical
intelligence, and practical wisdom to the educational challenges that
this national hospitality and its merciless contradictions require us
to meet.  We deplore the privatization and commercialization of public
schools and public colleges and universities as profoundly
undemocratic.  We value education that respects truths and their
experienced and observed complexities from diversely situated
perspectives; we condemn public deceit and falsehoods as public
miseducation.  We reject public attitudes of denial and indifference
toward the scientifically documented ecological crisis that now
afflicts our entire planet, damaging land, air, and water, and harming
human children while endangering countless species; such irresponsible
attitudes are profoundly miseducative.

All these severe challenges call for educators’ courage, creativity,
and wisdom.  These challenges impart practical urgency to AESA
members’ rigorous educational inquiry, thought, and criticism.  They
require our deliberate curricular, pedagogical, program, policy, and
community initiatives, in pragmatic ethical responses to these
challenges.  They demand our strategically vocal, conscientious
engagement in public controversies concerning them as well.

Sent by:
Jennifer Stoops
Social Media Fellow, Urban Education
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Communications Director
American Educational Studies Association