Society of Professor of Education Call for Papers, 2020, Due 1/7/20

 

 

From SPE President Fran Huckaby: The Society of Professors of Education (SPE) invites proposals for presentations at its annual meeting to be held during the 2020 AERA Annual Conference in San Francisco from April 17th to 21st. We are especially interested in presentations that are focused on the theme of “Seeking Embodied Justice in Unjust Times: The Legacy of Bernardo Gallegos.” Proposals not related to the theme but focused on the goals of the Society (below) are also welcome. Select papers presented at the conference will be published in Professing Education, Urban Review, Educational Studies and Journal of Latinos and Education.

Founded in 1902, the Society of Professors of Educationis a professional and academic association open to all persons engaged in teacher preparation, curriculum studies, educational foundations, and related activities. The Society’s primary goal is to provide a forum for consideration of major issues, tasks, problems, and challenges confronting professional educators. SPE is an interdisciplinary organization. Its members include both scholars and practitioners in education.      

All presenters must be members of the Society of Professors of Education. To be included in the conference program, join the Society at your earliest convenience. See the Society of Professors of Education web page for the membership form: http://societyofprofessorsofeducation.com

Please visit SPE on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/Society.of.Professors.of.Education/

Proposals must be submitted electronically to the Program Committee no later than January 7, 2020. The proposal must be sent as a Word document attachment in an e-mail addressed to SPEsubmissions@gmail.com. The subject line of the e-mail message must read: “SPE 2020 Proposal.” For detailed submission guidelines, refer to the SPE web page (link above).

SPE 2020 CAll for Proposals

 

Maxine Greene’s Legacy

Here is a tribute to Maxine Greene from Kurt Stemhagen, Executive Director of the Philosophy of Education Society. 

Former Philosophy of Education Society President Maxine Greene passed away Thursday at the age of 96. Her vast body of accomplishments on the part of the arts, continental philosophy, and education are well documented and too great to be enumerated in this brief announcement. Detailed accounts of her life and work can be found in the following links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxine_Greene

https://maxinegreene.org/

For the members of PES, she was a colleague, a mentor, a friend and a great inspiration. Her work in Phenomenology, aesthetics, and in thinking about social change, has left an indelible mark upon our collective work, and continues to challenge us to think beyond the “cotton wool” of every day experience, particularly those habits of mind that stultify academic discourse.

Maxine’s work is a testament to her Existentialist ethic of being forever “not yet.” She consistently found unexpected and unexplored corners in the overlap between philosophy and education, whether that meant a chapter on Melville in her early book on American education or a reinvention of the philosophical salon, held in her apartment overlooking Central Park on Sunday afternoons, in which sometimes forty or fifty people sat on the floor and stood in the hall to discuss favorite works of literature: Middlemarch, White Noise, Heart of Darkness.

Her perspective was not always received in the serious, earnest spirit with which it was offered. She often told a story of travelling to Bear Mountain to attend the nineteen sixty something spring meeting of the Middle Atlantic States Philosophy of Education Society, a boys’ club of analytical philosophers who tolerated her presence, to a point. That year, her paper on the power of poetics in relating the personal and the political was met with a two word response: “Fuck Rilke.” She always laughed at this part of the story, begging pardon for her “French,” and relating how frustrated she was by the easy dismissal of her ideas.

It may be obvious, but still worth pointing out that she was the one laughing at the end of that story, as time and changes in the culture of the academy made room for her brand of insight, and gradually eclipsed the work of those from whom she sought recognition. It may be even more obvious, and yet still worth stating that given the limited space for philosophical practice in a world of educational research ever more dominated by quantifiable gains, Maxine Greene’s legacy is even more important to us in remaining true to our work and finding new ways of articulating our ideas to the world beyond the academy.

Kurt Stemhagen, Associate Professor
Executive Director, Philosophy of Education Society
School of Education, Department of Foundations
Virginia Commonwealth University

Tribute to Maxine Greene (Word)   Tribute to Maxine Greene (PDF)